the think tank

Empirica offers the unique ability to connect with a group of esteemed consultants in the world of academic research.



Profiles

Dan Ariely, PhD

Duke University

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Dan Ariely is the James B. Duke Professor of Psychology & Behavioral Economics at Duke University.

His fascinating books are an eye-opening journey into the things that influence our behavior and how being irrational isn't always such a bad thing (the books are "Predictably Irrational" and "The Upside of Irrationality").

Dan has been working with Empirica on a project for the ACTU on Australians’ perceptions of wealth inequality. You can read the report here.

Sebastien Brion, PhD

IESE Business School, Barcelona

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He received his PhD in Organizational Behavior from the Haas School of Business at U.C. Berkeley, before moving to Europe to take his position at IESE in 2010.

His research covers topics such as accuracy and bias in interpersonal perception, power and influence, and group/team dynamics.

Amy Cuddy, PhD

Harvard Business School

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Amy J. C. Cuddy is an Assistant Professor in the Negotiation, Organizations & Markets Unit at the Harvard Business School. She holds a PhD in Psychology from Princeton University and BA in Psychology from the University of Colorado.

Professor Cuddy studies the origins and outcomes of how we perceive and are influenced by other people, investigating the roles of variables such as culture, emotions, nonverbal behaviors, and psychophysiological indicators.

Cuddy and her collaborators have developed a substantial body of research that focuses on judgments of other people and groups along two core trait dimensions, warmth and competence, which shape and motivate our social emotions, intentions, and behaviors. She examines how these social perception and influence processes play out in domains such as hiring, promotion, and charitable giving, for example. Her most recent work investigates how brief nonverbal expressions of competence/power and warmth/connection actually alter the neuroendocrine levels, expressions, and behaviors of the people making the expressions, even when the expressions are 'posed.'

Her research has been published in top academic journals, including Science, Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, and Trends in Cognitive Sciences. Her research has been covered on CNN, MSNBC, by the New York Times, Financial Times, Time Magazine, Boston Globe, and Wall Street Journal, among other news outlets. Her research was featured in Harvard Business Review's Breakthrough Ideas for 2009 ('Just because I'm nice, don't assume I'm dumb'), Scientific American Mind in 2010 ('Mixed impressions: How we judge others on multiple levels'), and as the cover story in the Nov-Dec 2010 issue of Harvard Magazine ('The Psyche on Automatic'). She won the Alexander Early Career Award from the Society for the Psychological Study of Social Issues in 2008 and was named a “Rising Star” in 2011 by the Association for Psychological Science. She also writes about issues at the intersection of psychology and management for Harvard Business Review.

Nick Haslam, PhD

University of Melbourne

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Nick is a Professor of Psychology at the University of Melbourne.

He received his PhD from the University of Pennsylvania in Social and Clinical Psychology and continues to research, publish and teach in both those fields.

He has a unique combination of academic and applied experience on barriers to self-change. He also has been a pioneer in new statistical techniques that can be applied to classification and segmentation analysis.

Broadly, his research covers areas such as social relationships, statistical methods, stereotyping and prejudice.

Jon Krosnick, PhD

Stanford University

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Jon Krosnick is the Frederic O. Glover Professor in Humanities and Social Sciences at Stanford University.

He also holds professorships in Communication, Political Science and Psychology. He is the author of four books and more than 140 articles and chapters.

He conducts research in three primary areas: (1) attitude formation, change, and effects, (2) the psychology of political behavior, and (3) the optimal design of questionnaires used for laboratory experiments and surveys, and survey research methodology more generally.

Simon Laham, PhD

University of Melbourne

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Simon is Research Fellow and Lecturer at the University of Melbourne Department of Psychology.

He received his PhD from UNSW and then went on to a post-doctoral fellowship at The University of Oxford, before returning to Australia to take up his position at the University of Melbourne.

Not only is Simon widely published in academic journals, he is also the author of a soon to be released book on the Science of Sin. By drawing on research in psychology, neuroscience and behavioural economics, he shows why the seven deadly sins might not be that deadly after all.

His academic research focuses on the psychology of morality and on the non-verbal communication of attitudes, beliefs and values.

He is currently working with Empirica on a project exploring the psychology of donation.

Brian Lowery, PhD

Stanford University

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Brian Lowery is an Associate Professor of Organizational Behavior at the Stanford Graduate School of Business.

He is a social psychologist and his core research areas are how people perceive inequality and the impact of non-conscious racial attitudes.

His work has been published in top academic journals and reported in numerous press outlets.

Michael Norton, PhD

Harvard University

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Michael Norton is an Associate Professor at Harvard Business School.

His PhD is in social psychology and his research has covered everything from perceptions of inequality through to the optimal number of features in products.

His research has been published in top academic journals and reported in media outlets such as the New York Times, the Wall Street Journal and the Washington Post.

His two major areas of research interest are the impact of social norms on our behavior and the emerging field of behavioral economics.

Michael has been working with Empirica on a project for the ACTU on Australians perceptions of wealth inequality (you can read the report here).

Jennifer Overbeck, PhD

Melbourne Business School

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Jennifer is Associate Professor at Melbourne Business School.

She received her PhD from the University of Colorado, and then took a post-doctoral fellowship at Stanford Graduate School of Business.

She is a social psychologist and her core areas of research are power and status, group membership and negotiation.

Her research has been widely published in academic journals and in popular press.

Also, Jennifer and Empirica's Cassie worked together (with Margaret Neale at Stanford) on a 2010 paper on Negotiation and Anger.

Patrick Vargas, PhD

University of Illinois

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Patrick is Associate Professor of Advertising at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

He is a social psychologist and his research focuses on attitudes, attitude measurement, stereotyping and persuasion. His work is published in leading academic journals.

He is also working on a stream of research that examines the ethics of 'direct to consumer' pharmaceutical advertising and will be spending some time in Melbourne Australia for that work in 2011.

Courtney von Hippel, PhD

University of Queensland

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Courtney is a Lecturer at the University of Queensland’s School of Psychology.

She received her PhD from the Ohio State University before moving to Australia. She is an Organizational Psychologist, but also brings in a wealth of knowledge from Social Psychology.

A core element of her research is intergroup relations and stereotyping in the workplace. One aspect of this line of research is how women perform (and feel) when they are in male-dominated fields (such as law, accounting, management) and much of this draws on the theory of 'stereotype threat.'

Understanding stereotype threat is crucial not only for performance of teams in the workplace, but also organizational structure, organizational change, attitudes towards management, and even consumer behavior…and apparently it might also be why women perform poorly in driving simulations – sometimes...! (as Courtney's 2008 paper 'Stereotype threat increases the likelihood that female drivers in a simulator run over jaywalkers' hints at).

Her research has been widely published in academic journals and has also led to numerous press articles.

Bill von Hippel, PhD

University of Queensland

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Bill is Professor and Head of School at the University of Queensland’s School of Psychology.

He received his BA from Yale, his PhD at the University of Michigan and then taught at Ohio State University before moving to Australia.

He is a social psychologist and his research spans topics such as 'Darwinian grand-parenting', the influence of attractive women on men’s risk taking, the impact of Viagra on endangered animals, the attitudes of health care workers towards injecting drug users and the effects of aging on inhibitory control (or, why older people can sometimes be very blunt).

Not only has his work been published in top academic journals, but it has also generated hundreds of media articles.

Christian Wheeler, PhD

Stanford University

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Christian Wheeler is an Associate Professor of Marketing at the Stanford Graduate School of Business.

With a PhD in social psychology, Christian is a leader in attitude change research.

His primary areas of research are attitudes and social cognition – this covers everything from how we make decisions, what things influence our everyday judgments and how things that we aren’t even consciously aware of can impact our attitudes and behaviors.